Title

Autism Spectrum Disorder and the G.F.C.F Diet

Faculty Mentor(s)

Tonya Butler-Collins

Proposal Type

Presentation

Location

Robinson Ballroom

Start Date

21-3-2012 1:20 PM

End Date

21-3-2012 1:35 PM

Description/Abstract

The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is on the rise in the United States. The increasing number of children with ASD has led to new fields of study within the medical community. We researched different case studies to determine if a gluten free – casein free diet was helping children with ASD. After investigating four different case studies we found that there was evidence that the change in diet helped the children with their behavioral difficulties and other symptoms. Many scientists have studied what causes adverse behavior and gastrointestinal issues in autistic children. Some have found the causes to be due to the improper metabolizing of proteins found in gluten and casein containing products (Seitler, B.N., PhD.) as well as the increase of antibodies which can trigger an inflammatory response in the intestine (Research on Dietary Interventions in ASD). These studies also found that when children with ASD were placed on a gluten free – casein free diet, symptoms observed by parents had improved. The issue with these conclusions is that, the idea is still new and all testing is being done on small scale groups. Testing on large groups is still required to make substantial progress.

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Mar 21st, 1:20 PM Mar 21st, 1:35 PM

Autism Spectrum Disorder and the G.F.C.F Diet

Robinson Ballroom

The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is on the rise in the United States. The increasing number of children with ASD has led to new fields of study within the medical community. We researched different case studies to determine if a gluten free – casein free diet was helping children with ASD. After investigating four different case studies we found that there was evidence that the change in diet helped the children with their behavioral difficulties and other symptoms. Many scientists have studied what causes adverse behavior and gastrointestinal issues in autistic children. Some have found the causes to be due to the improper metabolizing of proteins found in gluten and casein containing products (Seitler, B.N., PhD.) as well as the increase of antibodies which can trigger an inflammatory response in the intestine (Research on Dietary Interventions in ASD). These studies also found that when children with ASD were placed on a gluten free – casein free diet, symptoms observed by parents had improved. The issue with these conclusions is that, the idea is still new and all testing is being done on small scale groups. Testing on large groups is still required to make substantial progress.