Title

The Manipulation of the Tricholplusia ni. Through Dietary Molecules: Aspartame (Poster)

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Evan Lampert

Proposal Type

Poster

Location

Robinson Ballroom

Start Date

21-3-2012 1:40 PM

End Date

21-3-2012 1:55 PM

Description/Abstract

The primary goal of our study was to observe the adverse affects of aspartame on a living organism – the Tricholplusia ni. caterpillar. We also wanted to try and determine another organism's perspective, the ant Formica exsectoides, on the effects of aspartame. We hypothesized that the Tricholplusia ni. caterpillars that were fed the aspartame supplemented diet will noticeably weigh less than the control. Similarly, the caterpillars that were fed the aspartame diet will be less palatable to the Allegeny Mound Ants. We introduced the substance to ten out of twenty Tricholplusia ni.caterpillars for a period of ten days. Statistical analysis showed no significant effect of aspartame detected in our experiment. However, our hypothesis about the ant favoring the control over the experiment was correct. We also made an additional discover regarding the color and consistency of the bodily fluids of the caterpillars as the control was clear and more jello-like, whereas the experiment was slightly tinted green and the fluids were harder to contain as the resembled as liquid rather than a jello.

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Mar 21st, 1:40 PM Mar 21st, 1:55 PM

The Manipulation of the Tricholplusia ni. Through Dietary Molecules: Aspartame (Poster)

Robinson Ballroom

The primary goal of our study was to observe the adverse affects of aspartame on a living organism – the Tricholplusia ni. caterpillar. We also wanted to try and determine another organism's perspective, the ant Formica exsectoides, on the effects of aspartame. We hypothesized that the Tricholplusia ni. caterpillars that were fed the aspartame supplemented diet will noticeably weigh less than the control. Similarly, the caterpillars that were fed the aspartame diet will be less palatable to the Allegeny Mound Ants. We introduced the substance to ten out of twenty Tricholplusia ni.caterpillars for a period of ten days. Statistical analysis showed no significant effect of aspartame detected in our experiment. However, our hypothesis about the ant favoring the control over the experiment was correct. We also made an additional discover regarding the color and consistency of the bodily fluids of the caterpillars as the control was clear and more jello-like, whereas the experiment was slightly tinted green and the fluids were harder to contain as the resembled as liquid rather than a jello.