Title

Obstacle Course Racing (OCR): University – Community Engagement; 5K, Running; University Events

Proposal Type

Poster

Additional Presenter Information

Overview- Warren Caputo

Asst Prof, Health, PE & Rec

Nominated for CASE/Carnegie Foundation US Professor of the Year 2015missing image.gif UNG Teaching Excellence Award, 2014 M.Ed. Valdosta State University, B.S. Valdosta State University Brain Gym Certified, RRCA National Running Certification, Red Cross WSI Swim Instructor Certified, AHA CPR Certified Instructor Previously taught at Valencia College in Orlando, FL, and Brevard Community College in Melbourne, FL

Education

  • M.Ed. , Health and Physical Education , 1997

Personal Information

Warren is a Florida native, and enjoys personal time with family and friends. He and his wife Ashley Caputo live in Braselton, GA. He is a distance runner and has completed numerous marathons, many half-marathons, and about 50 triathlons, including the Ironman Triathlon. Warren is a huge Gator fan and loves most sports and activities.

Keywords

Obstacle Course Racing, Community Events, University Awareness

Subject Area

Physical Education

Start Date

11-11-2016 11:45 AM

End Date

11-11-2016 1:15 PM

Description/Abstract

Purpose: Substantial interest and participation has emerged in Obstacle Course Racing (OCR) as an endurance and fitness choice. There are now numerous OCR events hosted throughout the US. The purpose of the present study is to provide an informal survey researching value-added to the community and university in hosting OCR events on campus.

Method: In May 2016 participants of the 5th annual Muddy Duck Dash (MDD) were surveyed regarding their experience, which was hosted on the campus of the University of North Georgia (UNG). The MDD registered 1482 participants ranging from 4 to 65 years of age. Questionnaires were sent to 862 participants, age 18+, 14 days after the event was held. This was a convenience sample based on participants who included their email with registration.

Results: The survey yielded a response rate of 38% of which, 96% indicated they would like the event to continue to be hosted at UNG and 94% plan to return for future MDD. Fifty-four percent said their awareness of the University increased, and 86% viewed their perception of UNG as very positive or positive as a result of attending the event. Sixty-nine percent indicated they are more likely to return for another UNG event as a result of attending the MDD. When asked, “If you are the parent or guardian of a child under the age of 18, what is the likelihood that you would consider the University of North Georgia as an option for your child as a result of attending the MDD?”, 57% responded very likely or likely. Participant comments on the value-added to the community and university supported the statistical results.

Conclusions: There is a substantial value in hosting OCR events on a college campus. The event reflects well for the University as community engagement, and results support the value to the community as well as the University. Results indicate a value in hosting the event on campus as an indirect recruiting opportunity.

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Nov 11th, 11:45 AM Nov 11th, 1:15 PM

Obstacle Course Racing (OCR): University – Community Engagement; 5K, Running; University Events

Purpose: Substantial interest and participation has emerged in Obstacle Course Racing (OCR) as an endurance and fitness choice. There are now numerous OCR events hosted throughout the US. The purpose of the present study is to provide an informal survey researching value-added to the community and university in hosting OCR events on campus.

Method: In May 2016 participants of the 5th annual Muddy Duck Dash (MDD) were surveyed regarding their experience, which was hosted on the campus of the University of North Georgia (UNG). The MDD registered 1482 participants ranging from 4 to 65 years of age. Questionnaires were sent to 862 participants, age 18+, 14 days after the event was held. This was a convenience sample based on participants who included their email with registration.

Results: The survey yielded a response rate of 38% of which, 96% indicated they would like the event to continue to be hosted at UNG and 94% plan to return for future MDD. Fifty-four percent said their awareness of the University increased, and 86% viewed their perception of UNG as very positive or positive as a result of attending the event. Sixty-nine percent indicated they are more likely to return for another UNG event as a result of attending the MDD. When asked, “If you are the parent or guardian of a child under the age of 18, what is the likelihood that you would consider the University of North Georgia as an option for your child as a result of attending the MDD?”, 57% responded very likely or likely. Participant comments on the value-added to the community and university supported the statistical results.

Conclusions: There is a substantial value in hosting OCR events on a college campus. The event reflects well for the University as community engagement, and results support the value to the community as well as the University. Results indicate a value in hosting the event on campus as an indirect recruiting opportunity.