Title

IMPROVING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS: AUGMENTED FEEDBACK AND POST-EXAM DEBATE

Proposal Type

Poster

Keywords

critical thinking, classroom techniques, objective examinations, class discussion, participation, business law course

Subject Area

Business

Start Date

11-11-2016 11:45 AM

End Date

11-11-2016 1:15 PM

Description/Abstract

Studies have confirmed that critical thinking skills are necessary for a comprehensive education and successful business career, but methods for developing these skills are often missing in the classroom. The “Student Self-Initiated Challenge of Examination Questions” method is a pedagogical technique that encourages and increases critical thinking skills by allowing students to challenge objective examination questions through written feedback and classroom debate. The method was found to facilitate class discussion and participation while simultaneously reinforcing course content and was well liked by the students surveyed. Discussion and areas for future research follow presentation of data.

Bio

Daniel Boylan is an Assistant Professor of Accounting at the University of North Georgia. He specializes in Accounting Information Systems. Dan is a graduate of Purdue University. His contact information is dhboylan@ung.edu or 260.494.0645. Marni Brown is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of North Georgia. Marni is a graduate of the University of Nebraska/ Her contact information is marni.brown@ung.edu or 678.717.3481

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Nov 11th, 11:45 AM Nov 11th, 1:15 PM

IMPROVING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS: AUGMENTED FEEDBACK AND POST-EXAM DEBATE

Studies have confirmed that critical thinking skills are necessary for a comprehensive education and successful business career, but methods for developing these skills are often missing in the classroom. The “Student Self-Initiated Challenge of Examination Questions” method is a pedagogical technique that encourages and increases critical thinking skills by allowing students to challenge objective examination questions through written feedback and classroom debate. The method was found to facilitate class discussion and participation while simultaneously reinforcing course content and was well liked by the students surveyed. Discussion and areas for future research follow presentation of data.