Title

Mapping Matthew Arnold's First North American Lecture Tour

Proposal Type

Poster

Additional Presenter Information

Associate Department Head: English

Associate Professor: English

Gainesville Campus

Keywords

Matthew Arnold; Digital Humanities; Literature; Maps

Subject Area

English/Communications

Start Date

11-11-2016 11:45 AM

End Date

11-11-2016 1:15 PM

Description/Abstract

This project digitally renders, in an interactive map, Victorian poet and essayist Matthew Arnold's first lecture tour of North America. In addition to accurately plotting the locations Arnold visited, users can click on each location to view archival images of these buildings, as well as archival ephemera related to Arnold's visit and lecture. Finally, in order to bring the past into communication with the present, each location has been photographed in its current condition. The project's purpose is to digitally render the reality of this important visit and bring its vanishing traces to light as well as expose opportunities for archival research. This project has been made possible through the Shott Scholar Award.

Bio

Dr. Shannon Gilstrap earned his Ph.D. in Literature from Georgia State University, his MA in Literature from Clemson University, and his BA in Literature from Piedmont College. He has published and presented widely on Victorian Literature, but chiefly on Victorian poet and essayist Matthew Arnold. He is currently Associate Department Head of English.

Rights

The map & its written content is property of Shannon Gilstrap, and the images are used with permssion of the listed holding institution or the listed photographer.

 
Nov 11th, 11:45 AM Nov 11th, 1:15 PM

Mapping Matthew Arnold's First North American Lecture Tour

This project digitally renders, in an interactive map, Victorian poet and essayist Matthew Arnold's first lecture tour of North America. In addition to accurately plotting the locations Arnold visited, users can click on each location to view archival images of these buildings, as well as archival ephemera related to Arnold's visit and lecture. Finally, in order to bring the past into communication with the present, each location has been photographed in its current condition. The project's purpose is to digitally render the reality of this important visit and bring its vanishing traces to light as well as expose opportunities for archival research. This project has been made possible through the Shott Scholar Award.