Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kelly Cate

Proposal Type

Poster

Location

Open 3rd Floor

Start Date

4-4-2013 4:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2013 6:00 PM

Description/Abstract

Physical attractiveness has been shown to impact perceptions of stranger’s “sensitivity, kindness, intelligence, poise, and sociability,” (Bukley, 1983). Additionally, men who are perceived as more masculine are generally rated as more physically attractive (Urbaniak & Kilmann, 2006). Existing research supports that, across cultures, females find men perceived as having high status potential as more physically attractive (Elliot et al., 2010). The purpose of the current study was to analyze the effect of stereotyping on females’ perceptions of males. Female participants rated images of the same male model dressed in several current societal stereotypes (hipster, prep, cowboy, mountain man, and control). Each participant received one picture, which they rated on a series of characteristics including trustworthiness, overall likeability, and potential for success. Fifty female psychology students participated in the study as partial fulfillment of a course requirement. It was expected that the style of dress would significantly impact participant perceptions of the male model on attractiveness and all tested characteristics. Results are discussed in terms of first impressions and mate selection.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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Apr 4th, 4:30 PM Apr 4th, 6:00 PM

What Women Want

Open 3rd Floor

Physical attractiveness has been shown to impact perceptions of stranger’s “sensitivity, kindness, intelligence, poise, and sociability,” (Bukley, 1983). Additionally, men who are perceived as more masculine are generally rated as more physically attractive (Urbaniak & Kilmann, 2006). Existing research supports that, across cultures, females find men perceived as having high status potential as more physically attractive (Elliot et al., 2010). The purpose of the current study was to analyze the effect of stereotyping on females’ perceptions of males. Female participants rated images of the same male model dressed in several current societal stereotypes (hipster, prep, cowboy, mountain man, and control). Each participant received one picture, which they rated on a series of characteristics including trustworthiness, overall likeability, and potential for success. Fifty female psychology students participated in the study as partial fulfillment of a course requirement. It was expected that the style of dress would significantly impact participant perceptions of the male model on attractiveness and all tested characteristics. Results are discussed in terms of first impressions and mate selection.