Title

Reducing hospital noise: A literature review of quiet time protocols in acute care settings

Campus

Dahlonega

Subject Area

Nursing

Location

Library Room 163: Computer Classroom

Start Date

1-4-2014 12:30 PM

End Date

1-4-2014 1:50 PM

Description/Abstract

The purpose of this presentation is to determine whether or not quiet time protocols increase patient quality of sleep in acute care settings. The method is a literature review that explores current research regarding the use of these types of protocols to reduce hospital noise and promote optimal patient rest and sleep. The presentation will include a critical appraisal of the evidence, as well as future implications for nursing practice. This research is applicable in current practice, in that hospitals are a place of increased noise and inadequate sleep can greatly hinder the recovery process (Buxton et. al, 2012). Nurses are then in a prime position to decrease environmental stimuli within the hospital setting to provide a higher quality of care to patients.

Key words: quiet time, protocol, rest, sleep, healing, noise, acute care, unit

References

Buxton, O.M., Ellenbogen, J. M., Wang, W., Carballeira, A., O'Connor, S., Cooper, D., . . . Solet, J. M. (2012). Sleep disruption due to hospital noise: a prospective evaluation. Ann Intern Med, 157(3), p. 170-179. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00472

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Apr 1st, 12:30 PM Apr 1st, 1:50 PM

Reducing hospital noise: A literature review of quiet time protocols in acute care settings

Library Room 163: Computer Classroom

The purpose of this presentation is to determine whether or not quiet time protocols increase patient quality of sleep in acute care settings. The method is a literature review that explores current research regarding the use of these types of protocols to reduce hospital noise and promote optimal patient rest and sleep. The presentation will include a critical appraisal of the evidence, as well as future implications for nursing practice. This research is applicable in current practice, in that hospitals are a place of increased noise and inadequate sleep can greatly hinder the recovery process (Buxton et. al, 2012). Nurses are then in a prime position to decrease environmental stimuli within the hospital setting to provide a higher quality of care to patients.

Key words: quiet time, protocol, rest, sleep, healing, noise, acute care, unit

References

Buxton, O.M., Ellenbogen, J. M., Wang, W., Carballeira, A., O'Connor, S., Cooper, D., . . . Solet, J. M. (2012). Sleep disruption due to hospital noise: a prospective evaluation. Ann Intern Med, 157(3), p. 170-179. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00472