Title

The Pressure Is On: Repositioning Patients Every Two Hours

Faculty Mentor(s)

Loretta Delargy, Allyson Clapp

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Poster

Subject Area

Nursing

Location

Library Third Floor, Open Area

Start Date

2-4-2014 11:00 AM

End Date

2-4-2014 1:00 PM

Description/Abstract

Previous research studies have shown that repositioning patients every two hours prevents further skin breakdown while maintaining or improving the current skin condition in patients with a Braden Scale of twelve or less upon admission. Due to this research, it has become the standard protocol for bedridden patients. However, recent research indicates some of the same criteria but indicates that high-risk pressure areas are exposed to support structures no matter which position the patient is in. Although multiple articles support this standard of care, one article states that preventative measures are not related to preventing or improving pressure ulcers. This proposes the need for further research by concluding that other measures may be necessary in addition to repositioning every two hours in order to improve quality of care and patient’s skin integrity.

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Apr 2nd, 11:00 AM Apr 2nd, 1:00 PM

The Pressure Is On: Repositioning Patients Every Two Hours

Library Third Floor, Open Area

Previous research studies have shown that repositioning patients every two hours prevents further skin breakdown while maintaining or improving the current skin condition in patients with a Braden Scale of twelve or less upon admission. Due to this research, it has become the standard protocol for bedridden patients. However, recent research indicates some of the same criteria but indicates that high-risk pressure areas are exposed to support structures no matter which position the patient is in. Although multiple articles support this standard of care, one article states that preventative measures are not related to preventing or improving pressure ulcers. This proposes the need for further research by concluding that other measures may be necessary in addition to repositioning every two hours in order to improve quality of care and patient’s skin integrity.