Title

Examining the Relationship of Specific Instructor-to-Student Interactions and Feedback Practices to Perceived Student Satisfaction in Online Courses.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Josh Cuevas

Campus

Dahlonega

Subject Area

Education

Location

Library 3rd Floor Room 382

Start Date

1-4-2014 4:00 PM

End Date

1-4-2014 5:30 PM

Description/Abstract

This study was designed to examine which type of online interaction, either student-to-instructor, or student-to-student, is preferred by students and how this relates to student reported levels of online course satisfaction so that instructors may better structure their online course activities to maximize this particular type of interaction.

To better understand how students and instructors differ in their perceptions of online communication and feedback practices six different specific online instructor communication practices were examined by a relative ranking in order of importance by both students and instructors. These rankings were compared and contrasted then examined in terms of their relationship to student reported online course satisfaction in order to improve course design, instructor online communication, and feedback practices leading to higher levels of student reported online course satisfaction.

Student characteristics of age, gender and graduate status were also examined to see if these factors have any relationship to preferred type of interaction and student reported satisfaction.

 
Apr 1st, 4:00 PM Apr 1st, 5:30 PM

Examining the Relationship of Specific Instructor-to-Student Interactions and Feedback Practices to Perceived Student Satisfaction in Online Courses.

Library 3rd Floor Room 382

This study was designed to examine which type of online interaction, either student-to-instructor, or student-to-student, is preferred by students and how this relates to student reported levels of online course satisfaction so that instructors may better structure their online course activities to maximize this particular type of interaction.

To better understand how students and instructors differ in their perceptions of online communication and feedback practices six different specific online instructor communication practices were examined by a relative ranking in order of importance by both students and instructors. These rankings were compared and contrasted then examined in terms of their relationship to student reported online course satisfaction in order to improve course design, instructor online communication, and feedback practices leading to higher levels of student reported online course satisfaction.

Student characteristics of age, gender and graduate status were also examined to see if these factors have any relationship to preferred type of interaction and student reported satisfaction.