Title

Saving Appalachian Gardens and Stories: Growing community and sustainability through arts-based research

Faculty Mentor(s)

Roseann Kent

Campus

Dahlonega

Subject Area

Appalachian Studies

Location

Library 3rd Floor Room 382

Start Date

1-4-2014 12:30 PM

End Date

1-4-2014 1:50 PM

Description/Abstract

In this interdisciplinary project, students in the Departments of Visual Arts, Biology, and Appalachian Studies interviewed community members to collect, bank, grow, and share heirloom seeds and stories of Southern Appalachian foodways. Then, using arts based research, we identified visual and narrative metaphors in the transcripts, recordings and photos that not only reflected but directed the gathering of more data and the drawing of conclusions. Our scholarly understanding was rooted in the creation of an art piece that we call a “communograph.” This year’s installation was a collection of garden flags using photographic transfers and textile techniques such as fabric dying, embroidery, and quilting. An alumnae and student art educator from the Department of Visual Arts taught these techniques to non-artists, students majoring in biology, history, education, and business. In this presentation, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges of arts-based research as well as showcase selected garden flags and accompanying stories.

Note to Conference Administrators

Visual Arts / Appalachian Studies Panel

“Saving Appalachian Gardens and Stories: Growing community and sustainability through arts-based research”

Presenters: Kyle Clark, Sara Ewing, Kerby Wilkes, Cathryn Washell

“The American Flag, Dahlonega, and the University of North Georgia”

Presenter: Jillian Conner

“Anadalv (Sisters)”

Presenter: Kyle Clark

“Bone Deep”

Presenter: April Barr

“The Exploitation of Tradition”

Presenter: Jessica Jones

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Apr 1st, 12:30 PM Apr 1st, 1:50 PM

Saving Appalachian Gardens and Stories: Growing community and sustainability through arts-based research

Library 3rd Floor Room 382

In this interdisciplinary project, students in the Departments of Visual Arts, Biology, and Appalachian Studies interviewed community members to collect, bank, grow, and share heirloom seeds and stories of Southern Appalachian foodways. Then, using arts based research, we identified visual and narrative metaphors in the transcripts, recordings and photos that not only reflected but directed the gathering of more data and the drawing of conclusions. Our scholarly understanding was rooted in the creation of an art piece that we call a “communograph.” This year’s installation was a collection of garden flags using photographic transfers and textile techniques such as fabric dying, embroidery, and quilting. An alumnae and student art educator from the Department of Visual Arts taught these techniques to non-artists, students majoring in biology, history, education, and business. In this presentation, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges of arts-based research as well as showcase selected garden flags and accompanying stories.