Title

Effects of Participation in a Prison GED Program on Inmate Recidivism

Faculty Mentor(s)

John Batchelder

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Presentation - completed/ongoing

Subject Area

Criminal Justice

Location

LTC 163

Start Date

31-3-2015 11:00 AM

Description/Abstract

Brief Description: This study was designed to investigate criminal recidivism among inmates and how that is affected by completion of the GED certification while incarcerated. Specific relationships under study provide an opportunity to analyze patterns in recidivism among inmates who have, or have not, completed the GED while incarcerated. The purpose was to ultimately reduce recidivism among prison inmates. Additionally, an attempt was made to bolster and improve the education efforts of prison administrators who are involved in delivering education to learners behind bars.

Abstract: Inmate recidivism is a problem that is common to all corrections administrators. The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) estimates that 68% of prisoners are arrested for a new crime within three years of release. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of prison education programs whose goal is to prevent recidivism. The relationship between high-school equivalency and reoffending facilitates program introspection and measures learning effectiveness among inmates. The purpose was to adjust the educational delivery to better align inmate needs with the program’s overall goal of successfully staying out of prison.

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM

Effects of Participation in a Prison GED Program on Inmate Recidivism

LTC 163

Brief Description: This study was designed to investigate criminal recidivism among inmates and how that is affected by completion of the GED certification while incarcerated. Specific relationships under study provide an opportunity to analyze patterns in recidivism among inmates who have, or have not, completed the GED while incarcerated. The purpose was to ultimately reduce recidivism among prison inmates. Additionally, an attempt was made to bolster and improve the education efforts of prison administrators who are involved in delivering education to learners behind bars.

Abstract: Inmate recidivism is a problem that is common to all corrections administrators. The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) estimates that 68% of prisoners are arrested for a new crime within three years of release. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of prison education programs whose goal is to prevent recidivism. The relationship between high-school equivalency and reoffending facilitates program introspection and measures learning effectiveness among inmates. The purpose was to adjust the educational delivery to better align inmate needs with the program’s overall goal of successfully staying out of prison.