Reducing hospital noise: A literature review of quiet time protocols in acute care settings

Melody A. Trippe, University of North Georgia

I originally submitted this proposal as a "presentation," and was thus scheduled on April 1. I am so sorry! My teacher instructed me to re-submit. I need to present on April 2 with the other BSN nursing students who are doing poster presentations. Thank you so much.

Description/Abstract

The purpose of this presentation is to determine whether or not quiet time protocols increase patient quality of sleep in acute care settings. The method is a literature review that explores current research regarding the use of these types of protocols to reduce hospital noise and promote optimal patient rest and sleep. The presentation will include a critical appraisal of the evidence, as well as future implications for nursing practice. This research is applicable in current practice, in that hospitals are a place of increased noise and inadequate sleep can greatly hinder the recovery process (Buxton et. al, 2012). Nurses are then in a prime position to decrease environmental stimuli within the hospital setting to provide a higher quality of care to patients.

Key words: quiet time, protocol, rest, sleep, healing, noise, acute care, unit

References

Buxton, O.M., Ellenbogen, J. M., Wang, W., Carballeira, A., O'Connor, S., Cooper, D., . . . Solet, J. M. (2012). Sleep disruption due to hospital noise: a prospective evaluation. Ann Intern Med, 157(3), p. 170-179. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00472

 
Mar 30th, 12:00 PM

Reducing hospital noise: A literature review of quiet time protocols in acute care settings

The purpose of this presentation is to determine whether or not quiet time protocols increase patient quality of sleep in acute care settings. The method is a literature review that explores current research regarding the use of these types of protocols to reduce hospital noise and promote optimal patient rest and sleep. The presentation will include a critical appraisal of the evidence, as well as future implications for nursing practice. This research is applicable in current practice, in that hospitals are a place of increased noise and inadequate sleep can greatly hinder the recovery process (Buxton et. al, 2012). Nurses are then in a prime position to decrease environmental stimuli within the hospital setting to provide a higher quality of care to patients.

Key words: quiet time, protocol, rest, sleep, healing, noise, acute care, unit

References

Buxton, O.M., Ellenbogen, J. M., Wang, W., Carballeira, A., O'Connor, S., Cooper, D., . . . Solet, J. M. (2012). Sleep disruption due to hospital noise: a prospective evaluation. Ann Intern Med, 157(3), p. 170-179. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00472