Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Anastasia Lin

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Panel

Subject Area

English/Communications

Location

Nesbitt 3218

Start Date

25-3-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

25-3-2016 2:45 PM

Description/Abstract

This panel strives to draw attention to the field of interdisciplinary research and its implications for research dealing with literature. Using many unrelated fields such as, chemistry, geography, and psychology, and a bit of strong determination, the panel members have coaxed out new meaning from seemingly “dead” pieces of literature. Paper one will explore the short story, “Videotape” by Don DeLillo by widening the perspective from which it is read from strictly literary to psychological and scientific, using the principle of Schadenfreude and the Heisenburg Uncertainty Principle which gives readers a better understanding of character motivation resulting in deeper meaning from the text. Paper two is a interdisciplinary literary cartography project that explores F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Ice Palace” through a geographic lens. Literary cartography deepens readers understanding of the geographical and cultural differences between the main characters in the story. Paper three applies the techniques of literary cartography to the fictional work “In the Land of the Free” by Sui Sin Far in order to develop a greater sense of its context and background. Together, the panel aims to uncover the process of interdisciplinary research and its applications to literature.

Note to Conference Administrators

1. This panel aims to discuss the benefits of interdisciplinary studies as it relates to literature research.

2. "Literary Cartography on Fitzgerald's, 'The Ice Palace'"

"The Value of Literary Cartography"

3. Cindy Bell-Hulsey

Erin Hagebusch

Rights

Abstract 2: Literature and cartography seem to be from two distinctly different disciplines, but when combined, the results of literary cartography often produce profoundly enhanced readings. The purpose of literary cartography is to explore how understanding a geographic location in a piece of literature can shed new light on themes, characters, attitudes, and actions through the exploration of history, culture, and location, which cannot be understood as in depth by solely using literary techniques. For example, I explore the geographic and cultural differences of the North and South, which enhance the reading of “The Ice Palace” and explains the characters’ attitudes and actions. I examine “The Ice Palace” by F. Scott Fitzgerald with a geographic lens, through which I extrapolate the information I gather to predict where Sally Carol’s (the main character) hometown is actually located in order to further my understanding of her culture. Sally Carol is portrayed as lazy, but upon examination of her culture, readers can comprehend why she possesses the qualities she does. Southern culture is much more relaxed and personal than the cold and harsh North (which is when her fiancé, Harry, lives). I argue that the fictional hometown of Sally Carrol is actually the real St. George, Georgia, and knowing the actual location changes readers’ understanding of Sally Carrol’s character. In conclusion, this project sheds new light on the previously neglected transdisciplinary studies of literary cartography and enforces how geography can impact literary interpretations. Abstract 3: The goal of literary cartography is to use Geographic Information Systems and technology to accurately develop a working map that can be used to link literature and landscape. The development of GIS in the late twentieth century has opened the doors for advanced interdisciplinary research relating topography to works of literature; still, literary cartography is a relatively new field of study. Without utilizing literary cartography one cannot fully appreciate great works such as Beowulf and Homer’s The Iliad because so much of their meaning derives from the geographical environment of the story. My paper applies the techniques of this field to the fictional work “In the Land of the Free” by Sui Sin Far in order to develop a greater sense of its context and background. By charting the story line I was able to recognize key faults in my own mental map, such as my assumption that Little One’s nursery is much closer to his parent’s apartment than it really is, which in turn caused me to feel greater sympathy for the mother’s concern for her child. Closely examining the geography behind “In the Land of the Free” gives considerable insight into the significance and value of establishing a firm background in the literary cartography of a piece before attempting to understand it on a deeper level.

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Mar 25th, 1:30 PM Mar 25th, 2:45 PM

A Glimpse at Interdisciplinary Studies

Nesbitt 3218

This panel strives to draw attention to the field of interdisciplinary research and its implications for research dealing with literature. Using many unrelated fields such as, chemistry, geography, and psychology, and a bit of strong determination, the panel members have coaxed out new meaning from seemingly “dead” pieces of literature. Paper one will explore the short story, “Videotape” by Don DeLillo by widening the perspective from which it is read from strictly literary to psychological and scientific, using the principle of Schadenfreude and the Heisenburg Uncertainty Principle which gives readers a better understanding of character motivation resulting in deeper meaning from the text. Paper two is a interdisciplinary literary cartography project that explores F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Ice Palace” through a geographic lens. Literary cartography deepens readers understanding of the geographical and cultural differences between the main characters in the story. Paper three applies the techniques of literary cartography to the fictional work “In the Land of the Free” by Sui Sin Far in order to develop a greater sense of its context and background. Together, the panel aims to uncover the process of interdisciplinary research and its applications to literature.