Title

Ealing Comedies and Counterculture in the UK

Presenter Information

Sullivan Pollard, StudentFollow

Faculty Mentor(s)

Candice Wilson

Campus

Gainesville

Proposal Type

Presentation - completed/ongoing

Subject Area

English/Communications

Location

Library Technology Center 380

Start Date

24-3-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

24-3-2017 3:50 PM

Description/Abstract

My research will revolve around the social effects of Ealing comedies on Britain in the post war period. From 1947-1956, Ealing comedies were very popular films in Britain. The films I’ll be studying for this paper will include Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951). A common theme that runs through both of these is an individual that is powerless, but takes action in order to control their own destiny. Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) is a critique of the Peerage System, and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) uses a similar approach in order to take on banking.

This theme is important because of the social implications it has on a generation of children and young adults who would go on to create a counter-culture movement in Britain in the 1960s. My belief is that the famed comedies made by Ealing Studios in early post-war Britain had a lasting effect on its youth by taking on major governmental and economic institutions, and helped cultivate a generation of dissenters who would subvert traditional English culture as well as inspire a rise in liberalism in the 1960s.

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Mar 24th, 3:00 PM Mar 24th, 3:50 PM

Ealing Comedies and Counterculture in the UK

Library Technology Center 380

My research will revolve around the social effects of Ealing comedies on Britain in the post war period. From 1947-1956, Ealing comedies were very popular films in Britain. The films I’ll be studying for this paper will include Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951). A common theme that runs through both of these is an individual that is powerless, but takes action in order to control their own destiny. Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) is a critique of the Peerage System, and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) uses a similar approach in order to take on banking.

This theme is important because of the social implications it has on a generation of children and young adults who would go on to create a counter-culture movement in Britain in the 1960s. My belief is that the famed comedies made by Ealing Studios in early post-war Britain had a lasting effect on its youth by taking on major governmental and economic institutions, and helped cultivate a generation of dissenters who would subvert traditional English culture as well as inspire a rise in liberalism in the 1960s.