Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Katherine Kipp

Campus

Oconee

Proposal Type

Poster

Subject Area

Psychology

Location

Library Technology Center 3rd Floor Common Area

Start Date

24-3-2017 12:45 PM

End Date

24-3-2017 2:00 PM

Description/Abstract

The Minnesota Executive Function Scale (MEFS) is a test that was originally designed to measure executive function (EF) in ages two and up, but we propose to use the MEFS test to measure EF in adult populations for the first time. MEFS has been proven to be an effective measure of EF in children but has yet to be tested in adults. We expect MEFS to detect developmental, as well as individual differences in our participant pool of adult aged UNG Oconee students. The resulting data could prove valuable for constructing more thorough tests for measuring EF in adult populations, in addition to providing data on EF development in adults. Past studies have shown a strong correlation between frontal lobe development and EF. Because the frontal lobe is not fully developed until around age twenty-five, administering a MEFS test to an adult population could give valuable information about the test’s effectiveness in adults. Administering the MEFS test to an adult population will also allow a comparison of the Early Years Toolbox and MEFS in measuring the main aspects of executive function. These main aspects include inhibition, working memory, and flexibility. The test will be administered to participants drawn from the Psychology 1101 classes at UNG and the resulting data will be analyzed and compared to data from younger populations.

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Mar 24th, 12:45 PM Mar 24th, 2:00 PM

30. Measuring Executive Function in Adult Populations

Library Technology Center 3rd Floor Common Area

The Minnesota Executive Function Scale (MEFS) is a test that was originally designed to measure executive function (EF) in ages two and up, but we propose to use the MEFS test to measure EF in adult populations for the first time. MEFS has been proven to be an effective measure of EF in children but has yet to be tested in adults. We expect MEFS to detect developmental, as well as individual differences in our participant pool of adult aged UNG Oconee students. The resulting data could prove valuable for constructing more thorough tests for measuring EF in adult populations, in addition to providing data on EF development in adults. Past studies have shown a strong correlation between frontal lobe development and EF. Because the frontal lobe is not fully developed until around age twenty-five, administering a MEFS test to an adult population could give valuable information about the test’s effectiveness in adults. Administering the MEFS test to an adult population will also allow a comparison of the Early Years Toolbox and MEFS in measuring the main aspects of executive function. These main aspects include inhibition, working memory, and flexibility. The test will be administered to participants drawn from the Psychology 1101 classes at UNG and the resulting data will be analyzed and compared to data from younger populations.