Title

Archaeological Science - Where Something New Meets Something Old: 9DW276 (Rice Farm) as a Case Study

Academic Title

Assistant Professor

College

Arts and Letters

Department

HAP

Primary Campus

Dahlonega

Keywords

Woodland archaeology; Archaeological science; Archaeological excavation

Abstract

The Rice Farm site, located in Dawson County, Georgia was a Native American site occupied during the Middle and Late Woodland periods (approximately 300 BCE to 600 CE). Recent excavations at the site have identified pits and posts containing numerous artifacts and ecofacts left behind by the ancient inhabitants. These material remains attest to the economic, social, and ritual behaviors of the ancient occupants. This poster presents the ongoing study of the material culture, employing cutting-edge archaeological science to interpret the material remains of the past. Furthermore, this poster demonstrates the collaborative nature of archaeology as a “team sport” bringing specialists together to best understand past populations.

Biography

Dr. William Balco is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at University of North Georgia.

Proposal Type

Poster

Subject Area

History/Anthropology/Philosophy

Start Date

15-11-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

15-11-2019 2:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 15th, 12:00 PM Nov 15th, 2:30 PM

Archaeological Science - Where Something New Meets Something Old: 9DW276 (Rice Farm) as a Case Study

The Rice Farm site, located in Dawson County, Georgia was a Native American site occupied during the Middle and Late Woodland periods (approximately 300 BCE to 600 CE). Recent excavations at the site have identified pits and posts containing numerous artifacts and ecofacts left behind by the ancient inhabitants. These material remains attest to the economic, social, and ritual behaviors of the ancient occupants. This poster presents the ongoing study of the material culture, employing cutting-edge archaeological science to interpret the material remains of the past. Furthermore, this poster demonstrates the collaborative nature of archaeology as a “team sport” bringing specialists together to best understand past populations.