Title

Needle in the Haystack: Using LEAP Principles and Practices to Help Students Navigate Information Overload

Academic Title

Amanda Nash: Head Librarian, Associate Professor; Barbara Petersohn: Reference and Instruction Librarian, Associate Professor; Teresa Nesbitt: Reference and Instruction Librarian, Assistant Professor

College

Libraries

Department

Libraries

Primary Campus

Gainesville

Title of Award Granted

LEAP (Liberal Education, America's Promise) into Action Grant

Name of Institution that Granted the Award

University of North Georgia

Keywords

Information Literacy; Library Instruction; Instructional Design; High Impact Practices (HIPs)

Abstract

RSCH 1501: Research Strategies is a one-credit online course that introduces students to information literacy concepts. Over the course of eight weeks, RSCH 1501 helps students develop skills to think critically, ethically, and strategically about the information they create and consume. RSCH 1501 is structured across ten learning modules: an introduction, eight units focusing on specific course topics, and a conclusion. Each topic unit covers a particular skill, resource, or technique that students need to learn to become a better researcher.

Our LEAP proposal incorporated LEAP principles and practices in order to teach the skills needed in the current information environment more effectively. Our goal was to foster the expansion of critical thinking, so that students would not only build research skills in an academic context, but also understand how these skills are applicable beyond the classroom and in their everyday lives.

There are currently in place two methods to measure the effectiveness and impact of the course: Pre- and post-test student assessments, and data gleaned from student evaluations. To measure the impact of the proposed course revisions on student understanding of course concepts, we compared the pre- and post-test measures in place and examined if and how the revisions to the assignments and discussions impact student performance.

Biography

Amanda Nash is an Associate Professor and the Head Librarian at the Gainesville Campus. Her special interests include information literacy, curriculum development, and library administration. Barbara Petersohn has been a Reference and Instruction Librarian / Associate Professor at the Dahlonega Campus of UNG since 2012. Teresa Nesbitt is a Reference Services Librarian/Assistant Professor at the University of North Georgia’s Cumming Campus. She has been with UNG since 2017.

Proposal Type

Poster

Subject Area

Education

Start Date

15-11-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

15-11-2019 1:00 PM

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Nov 15th, 12:00 PM Nov 15th, 1:00 PM

Needle in the Haystack: Using LEAP Principles and Practices to Help Students Navigate Information Overload

RSCH 1501: Research Strategies is a one-credit online course that introduces students to information literacy concepts. Over the course of eight weeks, RSCH 1501 helps students develop skills to think critically, ethically, and strategically about the information they create and consume. RSCH 1501 is structured across ten learning modules: an introduction, eight units focusing on specific course topics, and a conclusion. Each topic unit covers a particular skill, resource, or technique that students need to learn to become a better researcher.

Our LEAP proposal incorporated LEAP principles and practices in order to teach the skills needed in the current information environment more effectively. Our goal was to foster the expansion of critical thinking, so that students would not only build research skills in an academic context, but also understand how these skills are applicable beyond the classroom and in their everyday lives.

There are currently in place two methods to measure the effectiveness and impact of the course: Pre- and post-test student assessments, and data gleaned from student evaluations. To measure the impact of the proposed course revisions on student understanding of course concepts, we compared the pre- and post-test measures in place and examined if and how the revisions to the assignments and discussions impact student performance.