Event Title

29 - ARE THE eIF2-α HOMOLOGUE AND PUTATIVE TYROSINE KINASE PROTEINS OF RANAVIRUSES SUITABLE TARGETS FOR PHYLOGENETIC RECONSTRUCTION?

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Amanda L.J. Duffus

Proposal Type

Poster

Start Date

3-11-2018 10:20 AM

End Date

3-11-2018 11:30 AM

Location

Nesbitt 3110

Abstract

ARE THE eIF2-α HOMOLOGUE AND PUTATIVE TYROSINE KINASE PROTEINS OF RANAVIRUSES SUITABLE TARGETS FOR PHYLOGENETIC RECONSTRUCTION?

Ami J. Davis*†, Justin D. Serna*† and Amanda L. J. Duffus, Gordon State College, Barnesville, GA, 30204 **† Co-first authors

Ranaviruses are rapidly emerging pathogens of ectothermic vertebrates. They have caused morbidity and mortality events around the globe for animals in both captivity and the wild. These viruses have been implicated in the decline and local extinctions of several species and are known to affect several endangered species. Therefore, it is important to analyze the phylogenetic relationships between the different species of Ranavirus to best address the threat that each may pose in certain circumstances. In this study we compare phylogenetic trees built using both the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 homologue (eIF2-α) and the putative tyrosine kinase protein to trees built using the major capsid protein (MCP) and whole genome sequences of 18 different ranaviruses. It was found that trees built using the putative tyrosine kinase protein and the eIF2-α homologue should not be used as alternatives to trees built using the MCP, because the phylogenetic relationships conveyed in the MCP tree are better supported. However, the putative tyrosine kinase and the eIF2-α homologue trees may still provide novel evolutionary information if used in more specific studies. These trees do show a few greatly supported branches, and therefore, could be used select studies and perhaps in conjunction with other genes.

Key Words: Ranavirus, phylogenetics, eIF2-α homologue, putative tyrosine kinase protein, major capsid protein, emerging pathogen

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Nov 3rd, 10:20 AM Nov 3rd, 11:30 AM

29 - ARE THE eIF2-α HOMOLOGUE AND PUTATIVE TYROSINE KINASE PROTEINS OF RANAVIRUSES SUITABLE TARGETS FOR PHYLOGENETIC RECONSTRUCTION?

Nesbitt 3110

ARE THE eIF2-α HOMOLOGUE AND PUTATIVE TYROSINE KINASE PROTEINS OF RANAVIRUSES SUITABLE TARGETS FOR PHYLOGENETIC RECONSTRUCTION?

Ami J. Davis*†, Justin D. Serna*† and Amanda L. J. Duffus, Gordon State College, Barnesville, GA, 30204 **† Co-first authors

Ranaviruses are rapidly emerging pathogens of ectothermic vertebrates. They have caused morbidity and mortality events around the globe for animals in both captivity and the wild. These viruses have been implicated in the decline and local extinctions of several species and are known to affect several endangered species. Therefore, it is important to analyze the phylogenetic relationships between the different species of Ranavirus to best address the threat that each may pose in certain circumstances. In this study we compare phylogenetic trees built using both the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 homologue (eIF2-α) and the putative tyrosine kinase protein to trees built using the major capsid protein (MCP) and whole genome sequences of 18 different ranaviruses. It was found that trees built using the putative tyrosine kinase protein and the eIF2-α homologue should not be used as alternatives to trees built using the MCP, because the phylogenetic relationships conveyed in the MCP tree are better supported. However, the putative tyrosine kinase and the eIF2-α homologue trees may still provide novel evolutionary information if used in more specific studies. These trees do show a few greatly supported branches, and therefore, could be used select studies and perhaps in conjunction with other genes.

Key Words: Ranavirus, phylogenetics, eIF2-α homologue, putative tyrosine kinase protein, major capsid protein, emerging pathogen