Event Title

18 - How College Student's View Three Strike Laws

Proposal Type

Poster

Start Date

3-11-2018 3:20 PM

End Date

3-11-2018 4:30 PM

Location

Nesbitt 3110

Abstract

In an effort to deter criminal activities, three strike laws increase the severity of punishment for repeat felony criminals. This study plans to analyze how college students view three strike laws. The administration of research will be done in a closed-ended survey format given to college students at a medium-sized state university located in the southeastern region of the United States. There have been many public opinion polls and surveys related to how people perceive mandatory sentencing laws (Roberts, 2003). While these polls and surveys are important to consider, there are two major criticisms of them. Opinion polls and surveys measuring public perceptions of Three strike laws have imbedded question biases and stereotypes of offenders. To control for these preconceptions, this study will present respondents with summaries of actual cases and asked participants to judge the fairness of each sentence. The results of the study and policy implications will be discussed.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 3rd, 3:20 PM Nov 3rd, 4:30 PM

18 - How College Student's View Three Strike Laws

Nesbitt 3110

In an effort to deter criminal activities, three strike laws increase the severity of punishment for repeat felony criminals. This study plans to analyze how college students view three strike laws. The administration of research will be done in a closed-ended survey format given to college students at a medium-sized state university located in the southeastern region of the United States. There have been many public opinion polls and surveys related to how people perceive mandatory sentencing laws (Roberts, 2003). While these polls and surveys are important to consider, there are two major criticisms of them. Opinion polls and surveys measuring public perceptions of Three strike laws have imbedded question biases and stereotypes of offenders. To control for these preconceptions, this study will present respondents with summaries of actual cases and asked participants to judge the fairness of each sentence. The results of the study and policy implications will be discussed.