Event Title

40 - Programming a TeachMover Robot Arm

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Sairm Tangirala Dr. Sae Tong Lee

Proposal Type

Poster

Start Date

3-11-2018 10:20 AM

End Date

3-11-2018 11:30 AM

Location

Nesbitt 3110

Abstract

The TeachMover is a Motorola 6502 microprocessor based, six-motor joint, programmable mechanical arm. It was introduced as an accessible and effective educational device to teach basic functions of an industrial robotic arm. In this poster, we present initial results of our Python program that uses the arm to perform simple and compound movements with a precision and extends arm’s functionality to play a game of chess. Since there are five stepper motors that contribute to the arm’s movements, we start our investigation by identifying the behaviors of the five motors that are responsible for moving along the x-, y-, and z-axes. This is done by plotting angular positions of five motors versus spatial locations of the arm on a 2D chessboard as the robotic arm sweeps the chess board systematically. Using these plots, we plan to design algorithms to implement various chess moves using the robotic arm. The second step is to extend the Python program to interface the robot arm with a chess engine and to obtain, store, and analyze data obtained during a game of chess.

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Nov 3rd, 10:20 AM Nov 3rd, 11:30 AM

40 - Programming a TeachMover Robot Arm

Nesbitt 3110

The TeachMover is a Motorola 6502 microprocessor based, six-motor joint, programmable mechanical arm. It was introduced as an accessible and effective educational device to teach basic functions of an industrial robotic arm. In this poster, we present initial results of our Python program that uses the arm to perform simple and compound movements with a precision and extends arm’s functionality to play a game of chess. Since there are five stepper motors that contribute to the arm’s movements, we start our investigation by identifying the behaviors of the five motors that are responsible for moving along the x-, y-, and z-axes. This is done by plotting angular positions of five motors versus spatial locations of the arm on a 2D chessboard as the robotic arm sweeps the chess board systematically. Using these plots, we plan to design algorithms to implement various chess moves using the robotic arm. The second step is to extend the Python program to interface the robot arm with a chess engine and to obtain, store, and analyze data obtained during a game of chess.