Title

30. Effects of adolescent prescription stimulants and stress on adult addiction susceptibility

Faculty Mentor(s)

Ryan Shanks, Steven Lloyd

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Poster

Subject Area

Biology

Location

Nesbitt 3110

Start Date

23-3-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

23-3-2018 12:00 PM

Description/Abstract

Adolescence represents a time of physical change and psychosocial stressors with an increased incidence of risk-seeking tendencies. Notably, adolescence is characterized as a critical window of neurological development. This maturation of neurocircuitry combined with risk-seeking tendencies results in a period of vulnerability to harmful factors such as drugs of abuse, or even chronic stress. The increasing availability, over-prescription, and subsequent misuse/abuse of ADHD-psychostimulant medications, such as dextroamphetamine (Adderall®) or methylphenidate (Ritalin®), in adolescent populations, necessitates studies investigating the long-term effects of these drugs. C57Bl/6J-mice were exposed to 1.0 mg/kg amphetamine (AMPH) or methylphenidate (MPD) from postnatal days 42-51 (late adolescence). After postnatal day 90, adult mice were challenged with a subacute methamphetamine (METH) dose (0.5 mg/kg). To test the long-term effects of adolescent drug exposures, animal activity was assessed using an open field chamber. Increased open field activity is a common measurement of behavioral sensitization, which is a hallmark of addiction. Late adolescent AMPH (male) and MPD (male and female) exposures induced cross-sensitization to METH in adulthood suggesting a sex-specific increased susceptibility to substance use. Unlike previous early adolescence studies, late-adolescent saline control treatments also induced adult cross-sensitization to METH. To isolate the hypothesized effects of the drug dosing induced stress, additional controls were included. Preliminary data suggest that adolescent stress produces a synergistic effect to drug exposure with adult addiction susceptibility. This study demonstrates differential drug-, sex-, and development-specific alterations induced by adolescent psychostimulant exposure and stress, leading to detrimental behavioral alterations toward drug abuse that persist into adulthood.

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Mar 23rd, 11:00 AM Mar 23rd, 12:00 PM

30. Effects of adolescent prescription stimulants and stress on adult addiction susceptibility

Nesbitt 3110

Adolescence represents a time of physical change and psychosocial stressors with an increased incidence of risk-seeking tendencies. Notably, adolescence is characterized as a critical window of neurological development. This maturation of neurocircuitry combined with risk-seeking tendencies results in a period of vulnerability to harmful factors such as drugs of abuse, or even chronic stress. The increasing availability, over-prescription, and subsequent misuse/abuse of ADHD-psychostimulant medications, such as dextroamphetamine (Adderall®) or methylphenidate (Ritalin®), in adolescent populations, necessitates studies investigating the long-term effects of these drugs. C57Bl/6J-mice were exposed to 1.0 mg/kg amphetamine (AMPH) or methylphenidate (MPD) from postnatal days 42-51 (late adolescence). After postnatal day 90, adult mice were challenged with a subacute methamphetamine (METH) dose (0.5 mg/kg). To test the long-term effects of adolescent drug exposures, animal activity was assessed using an open field chamber. Increased open field activity is a common measurement of behavioral sensitization, which is a hallmark of addiction. Late adolescent AMPH (male) and MPD (male and female) exposures induced cross-sensitization to METH in adulthood suggesting a sex-specific increased susceptibility to substance use. Unlike previous early adolescence studies, late-adolescent saline control treatments also induced adult cross-sensitization to METH. To isolate the hypothesized effects of the drug dosing induced stress, additional controls were included. Preliminary data suggest that adolescent stress produces a synergistic effect to drug exposure with adult addiction susceptibility. This study demonstrates differential drug-, sex-, and development-specific alterations induced by adolescent psychostimulant exposure and stress, leading to detrimental behavioral alterations toward drug abuse that persist into adulthood.