Title

32. Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae in North Georgia Water

Faculty Mentor(s)

Swapna Bhat, Jeanelle Morgan

Campus

Gainesville

Proposal Type

Poster

Subject Area

Biology

Location

Nesbitt 3110

Start Date

23-3-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

23-3-2018 12:00 PM

Description/Abstract

Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are a group of enzymes shown to rapidly evolve and confer resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin and beta lactams. Organisms that produce ESBLs pose as threats and challenges due to their multi-drug resistance. ESBLs exhibit antibiotic resistance by destructing the structure of antibiotics and are typically found encoded on bacterial plasmids that can easily be transferred between bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae via horizontal and vertical transmission. Water environments such as streams can aid the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can originate from a variety of sources, such as wastewater treatment plants, agricultural sources and residential septic tank systems. An ongoing study is currently looking into the isolation and identification of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from three streams: one impacted by a heavily industrialized area, one with some urban impact and one with very little urban impact. Water samples were obtained from each water source and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were isolated. DNA from these isolates were extracted and tested for confirmation of the genes encoding ESBLs.

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Mar 23rd, 11:00 AM Mar 23rd, 12:00 PM

32. Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae in North Georgia Water

Nesbitt 3110

Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are a group of enzymes shown to rapidly evolve and confer resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin and beta lactams. Organisms that produce ESBLs pose as threats and challenges due to their multi-drug resistance. ESBLs exhibit antibiotic resistance by destructing the structure of antibiotics and are typically found encoded on bacterial plasmids that can easily be transferred between bacteria from the family Enterobacteriaceae via horizontal and vertical transmission. Water environments such as streams can aid the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can originate from a variety of sources, such as wastewater treatment plants, agricultural sources and residential septic tank systems. An ongoing study is currently looking into the isolation and identification of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae from three streams: one impacted by a heavily industrialized area, one with some urban impact and one with very little urban impact. Water samples were obtained from each water source and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were isolated. DNA from these isolates were extracted and tested for confirmation of the genes encoding ESBLs.