Title

Popular 19th and 20th century community music within the African American population

Presenter Information

Ashlynn NashFollow

Faculty Mentor(s)

Esther Morgan-Ellis

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

Music

Location

MPR 3

Start Date

22-3-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

22-3-2019 11:00 AM

Description/Abstract

My presentation is inspired by popular music within the African American community during the 19th and 20th century. I will address music involved with the Civil War, civil rights, slavery, black beauty and the struggle of being an African American during this time, as well as document music that contradicted what the African American community was fighting for during this time. Specifically, I will examine how often these examples of music show up in song books and newspapers. These examples of music were intended for community singing. I will examine the ratio of African American composers verses white composers during this time and analyze their purpose for writing this music as well as reflect on how often the music shows up and where it appears most commonly.

Note to Conference Administrators

This submission is part of a panel. The other submissions will come from Anita Ingram, Emily Nelson, and Devin Hing.

Media Format

flash_audio

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Mar 22nd, 10:00 AM Mar 22nd, 11:00 AM

Popular 19th and 20th century community music within the African American population

MPR 3

My presentation is inspired by popular music within the African American community during the 19th and 20th century. I will address music involved with the Civil War, civil rights, slavery, black beauty and the struggle of being an African American during this time, as well as document music that contradicted what the African American community was fighting for during this time. Specifically, I will examine how often these examples of music show up in song books and newspapers. These examples of music were intended for community singing. I will examine the ratio of African American composers verses white composers during this time and analyze their purpose for writing this music as well as reflect on how often the music shows up and where it appears most commonly.