Title

Factors Associated with Reducing Recidivism Among Juveniles: A Review of Interventions

Presenter Information

Jordan GriffinFollow

Faculty Mentor(s)

John Stuart Batchelder

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

Criminal Justice

Location

MPR 2

Start Date

22-3-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

22-3-2019 2:00 PM

Description/Abstract

This paper reviews the literature on juvenile interventions, both to prevent offending and to prevent reoffending while on probation. Interventions designed to reduce delinquent behavior are administered to juveniles both prior to offending, those in the cycle who are currently serving on probation. This paper explores the evidence, and evaluates results for juveniles attending public school. Studies are reviewed that examine juvenile intervention programs, which target children diagnosed with learning, behavioral, and social disorders, and the accompanying behavior and impulse problems associated with those disabilities. Interventions included medication, nutritional supplements, neuropsychological training, and improving self-awareness to prevent delinquent behavior among this population. These studies have shown a decrease in the offending and reoffending of juveniles who are treated. This paper explores the research to discover the effectiveness of programs offered for juveniles who are still in school, prior to offending, and those who are on juvenile probation.

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Mar 22nd, 1:00 PM Mar 22nd, 2:00 PM

Factors Associated with Reducing Recidivism Among Juveniles: A Review of Interventions

MPR 2

This paper reviews the literature on juvenile interventions, both to prevent offending and to prevent reoffending while on probation. Interventions designed to reduce delinquent behavior are administered to juveniles both prior to offending, those in the cycle who are currently serving on probation. This paper explores the evidence, and evaluates results for juveniles attending public school. Studies are reviewed that examine juvenile intervention programs, which target children diagnosed with learning, behavioral, and social disorders, and the accompanying behavior and impulse problems associated with those disabilities. Interventions included medication, nutritional supplements, neuropsychological training, and improving self-awareness to prevent delinquent behavior among this population. These studies have shown a decrease in the offending and reoffending of juveniles who are treated. This paper explores the research to discover the effectiveness of programs offered for juveniles who are still in school, prior to offending, and those who are on juvenile probation.