Title

Comparing Computer-Based Programs’ Impact on Problem Solving Ability and Motivation

Presenter Information

Hannah DosterFollow

Faculty Mentor(s)

Josh Cuevas

Campus

Cumming

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

Education

Location

Conference Room

Start Date

22-3-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

22-3-2019 11:00 AM

Description/Abstract

Teaching mathematics involves a variety of techniques and approaches in order to reach students’ academic needs in a way that aids them in achieving at the level required by state standards. One of the ways that educators are meeting the needs of their students is through using computer-based programs. Computer-based programs offer an assortment of features that can uniquely serve students. In this eight-week study, 20 fifth grade students were placed into two groups and assigned computer-based programs. One program, MobyMax, offered students scaffolding measures to aid in concept development. The other program, IXL, offered students detailed feedback in response to their answer submissions. This study was designed to determine the impact of the features of the two computer-based programs on student achievement through problem solving. Additionally, in this study the amount of time spent by students on the computer-based programs was compared to student achievement measures and measures were taken to examine student motivation toward mathematics prior to and after working with these computer-based programs.

Media Format

flash_audio

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Mar 22nd, 10:00 AM Mar 22nd, 11:00 AM

Comparing Computer-Based Programs’ Impact on Problem Solving Ability and Motivation

Conference Room

Teaching mathematics involves a variety of techniques and approaches in order to reach students’ academic needs in a way that aids them in achieving at the level required by state standards. One of the ways that educators are meeting the needs of their students is through using computer-based programs. Computer-based programs offer an assortment of features that can uniquely serve students. In this eight-week study, 20 fifth grade students were placed into two groups and assigned computer-based programs. One program, MobyMax, offered students scaffolding measures to aid in concept development. The other program, IXL, offered students detailed feedback in response to their answer submissions. This study was designed to determine the impact of the features of the two computer-based programs on student achievement through problem solving. Additionally, in this study the amount of time spent by students on the computer-based programs was compared to student achievement measures and measures were taken to examine student motivation toward mathematics prior to and after working with these computer-based programs.