Title

Adolescent Language Development in the Age of Technology: The Implementation of Technology Inside the Classroom

Presenter Information

Joshua VaughnFollow

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Donna Gessell

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

English

Location

MPR 2

Start Date

22-3-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

22-3-2019 3:00 PM

Description/Abstract

This paper explores the implementation of technology in the classroom. While significant research has examined the relationship between the classroom, technology, and instructors, hardly any research has been conducted examining the way technology must be programmed to help student language proficiency. By examining current linguistic theory about first language acquisition, it may be possible to understand why technology usually receives negative feedback when implemented as a language-learning tool. With first language acquisition theory in mind, technology can be applied to benefit students’ basic grammar skills. As time continues, the use of technology in the classroom will increase, and technological advancements will continue. Perhaps to effectively implement modern technology in classrooms, an instruction method where technology is complementary to instruction needs to be created rather than technology being used as supplemental to an already stable learning environment or instructing method.

Note to Conference Administrators

Linguistics

Media Format

flash_audio

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Mar 22nd, 2:00 PM Mar 22nd, 3:00 PM

Adolescent Language Development in the Age of Technology: The Implementation of Technology Inside the Classroom

MPR 2

This paper explores the implementation of technology in the classroom. While significant research has examined the relationship between the classroom, technology, and instructors, hardly any research has been conducted examining the way technology must be programmed to help student language proficiency. By examining current linguistic theory about first language acquisition, it may be possible to understand why technology usually receives negative feedback when implemented as a language-learning tool. With first language acquisition theory in mind, technology can be applied to benefit students’ basic grammar skills. As time continues, the use of technology in the classroom will increase, and technological advancements will continue. Perhaps to effectively implement modern technology in classrooms, an instruction method where technology is complementary to instruction needs to be created rather than technology being used as supplemental to an already stable learning environment or instructing method.