Title

Twilight of Democratic Consolidation

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Dwight Wilson

Campus

Gainesville

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

International Affairs/Political Science

Location

MPR 1

Start Date

22-3-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

22-3-2019 10:00 AM

Description/Abstract

Democratic consolidation is a political science theory that identifies a point at which democracies have achieved immortality. We believe this previously unexamined theory is a flawed concept based on two reasons. Firstly, we will note how previous research has sought different “missing ingredients,” such as a democratic culture, a particular constitution, or economic development, which create a consolidated democracy. We find there are no such missing ingredients. Secondly, this theory assumes that democracies are the most stable type of government, and thus are the ultimate end goal of government systems. We will question the fundamental stability of democracy. Due to the sheer scope of this project, however, this proposal is limited to a theoretical critique of democratic consolidation. We argue that democratic consolidation is a concept that has outlived its usefulness. We hope to apply this critique to future projects in order to shift the conversation regarding democracy and current instability from Poland to Venezuela.

Media Format

flash_audio

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 22nd, 9:00 AM Mar 22nd, 10:00 AM

Twilight of Democratic Consolidation

MPR 1

Democratic consolidation is a political science theory that identifies a point at which democracies have achieved immortality. We believe this previously unexamined theory is a flawed concept based on two reasons. Firstly, we will note how previous research has sought different “missing ingredients,” such as a democratic culture, a particular constitution, or economic development, which create a consolidated democracy. We find there are no such missing ingredients. Secondly, this theory assumes that democracies are the most stable type of government, and thus are the ultimate end goal of government systems. We will question the fundamental stability of democracy. Due to the sheer scope of this project, however, this proposal is limited to a theoretical critique of democratic consolidation. We argue that democratic consolidation is a concept that has outlived its usefulness. We hope to apply this critique to future projects in order to shift the conversation regarding democracy and current instability from Poland to Venezuela.