Presenter Information

Kathryn MonheimFollow

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Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr Jeremy Olson

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Visual Presentation

Subject Area

Chemistry

Location

Poster Session

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 PM

End Date

26-3-2021 1:00 PM

Description/Abstract

Caged compounds are organic compounds with the ability to temporarily deactivate biologically active molecules until those molecules are released by the light of a certain wavelength. We have studied how changing different peripheral groups around a coumarin scaffold affects the maximum absorption wavelength. By being able to select the wavelength at which these compounds are uncaged, we can choose when these compounds will be released even in the presence of other caged molecules. By controlling the wavelengths these molecules uncage at neuroscientists have used pairs of molecules with opposite effects to produce signals to essentially turn on and off neuronal signaling.

Note to Conference Administrators

1) The Effects of Changing Electron Withdrawing Groups to Shift the Maximum Absorption Wavelength

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Media Format

flash_audio

Research Poster - Finalized (1).pptx (725 kB)
The Effects of Changing Electron Donating Groups to Shift the Maximum Absorption Wavelength

Poster Presentation - ARC.mp4 (7683 kB)
Poster Presentation Video

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Mar 26th, 12:00 PM Mar 26th, 1:00 PM

02. The Effects of Changing Electron Withdrawing Groups to Shift the Maximum Absorption Wavelengths (1st place Poster Submission)

Poster Session

Caged compounds are organic compounds with the ability to temporarily deactivate biologically active molecules until those molecules are released by the light of a certain wavelength. We have studied how changing different peripheral groups around a coumarin scaffold affects the maximum absorption wavelength. By being able to select the wavelength at which these compounds are uncaged, we can choose when these compounds will be released even in the presence of other caged molecules. By controlling the wavelengths these molecules uncage at neuroscientists have used pairs of molecules with opposite effects to produce signals to essentially turn on and off neuronal signaling.