Title

3C: Effects of Movement Integration on Students’ Academic Success, Time On-Task, and Self-Efficacy

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Joshua Cuevas

Campus

Cumming

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

Education

Location

Panel 3: C (Register Here)

Start Date

26-3-2021 9:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 9:50 AM

Description/Abstract

This study demonstrates the effects of movement integration (MI) on academic scores, time on-task, and student motivation for Algebra I students in a public middle school in a suburban area outside of Atlanta, Georgia. MI refers to bringing physical movement of students into the planning and instruction of all academic subjects, and includes short periods of light movement in the classroom. The control group (n = 52) and the experimental group (n = 29) both completed pre- and post-tests and pre- and post-surveys to determine changes in academic scores and motivation. Time-on task was recorded for the first and last weeks of the study to explore differences between the groups. In both groups, half of the students worked in-person while half of the students worked digitally. The experimental group participated in MI a minimum of three days a week for 10 to 15 minutes each class period for the duration of two academic units (30-45 minutes of MI per week). All data were analyzed quantitatively to examine the results of MI for academic success, time on-task, and self-efficacy in students. Currently, there is more research for MI in the elementary setting, so this study aimed to contribute to existing evidence of MI in the middle school environment. The majority of the research shows either positive or no significant effects for students, so there is a need for further research on MI in the classroom.

Media Format

flash_audio

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 9:00 AM Mar 26th, 9:50 AM

3C: Effects of Movement Integration on Students’ Academic Success, Time On-Task, and Self-Efficacy

Panel 3: C (Register Here)

This study demonstrates the effects of movement integration (MI) on academic scores, time on-task, and student motivation for Algebra I students in a public middle school in a suburban area outside of Atlanta, Georgia. MI refers to bringing physical movement of students into the planning and instruction of all academic subjects, and includes short periods of light movement in the classroom. The control group (n = 52) and the experimental group (n = 29) both completed pre- and post-tests and pre- and post-surveys to determine changes in academic scores and motivation. Time-on task was recorded for the first and last weeks of the study to explore differences between the groups. In both groups, half of the students worked in-person while half of the students worked digitally. The experimental group participated in MI a minimum of three days a week for 10 to 15 minutes each class period for the duration of two academic units (30-45 minutes of MI per week). All data were analyzed quantitatively to examine the results of MI for academic success, time on-task, and self-efficacy in students. Currently, there is more research for MI in the elementary setting, so this study aimed to contribute to existing evidence of MI in the middle school environment. The majority of the research shows either positive or no significant effects for students, so there is a need for further research on MI in the classroom.