Greater arts funding in public schooling and its effects on society beyond education

Grady Klein

Description/Abstract

The United States spends more on public education per student than all but three countries in the world based on a 2016 finding from the National Center for Education Statistics, and yet a similar study by the same agency three years later demonstrates that, by comparison, the literacy of those students is faring much worse than countries of lesser FTE (Full-time equivalent) funding - where approximately 21% of adults read under a 12th-grade reading level. Empirical data suggests that an increase in creative arts involvement among students leads to an increase in overall student participation in general education studies and further reduces the drop-out rate and criminality of adolescents transitioning into adulthood - even when the students forgo a post-secondary education. In an era of sizeable social interactivity over digital media, where an immeasurable quantity of information is exchanged between billions of individuals every day, there is an urgent need for the greater proliferation of a well-educated populace through whom change may be exacted. This article will discuss the implications of expanded creative arts education having adequate funding, further seeking to demonstrate that more significant investment in arts education has a positive and profound influence on overall intellectual function and, ultimately, on people's ability to contribute to society.

 
Mar 26th, 11:00 AM Mar 26th, 11:50 AM

Greater arts funding in public schooling and its effects on society beyond education

Panel 1: F (Register Here)

The United States spends more on public education per student than all but three countries in the world based on a 2016 finding from the National Center for Education Statistics, and yet a similar study by the same agency three years later demonstrates that, by comparison, the literacy of those students is faring much worse than countries of lesser FTE (Full-time equivalent) funding - where approximately 21% of adults read under a 12th-grade reading level. Empirical data suggests that an increase in creative arts involvement among students leads to an increase in overall student participation in general education studies and further reduces the drop-out rate and criminality of adolescents transitioning into adulthood - even when the students forgo a post-secondary education. In an era of sizeable social interactivity over digital media, where an immeasurable quantity of information is exchanged between billions of individuals every day, there is an urgent need for the greater proliferation of a well-educated populace through whom change may be exacted. This article will discuss the implications of expanded creative arts education having adequate funding, further seeking to demonstrate that more significant investment in arts education has a positive and profound influence on overall intellectual function and, ultimately, on people's ability to contribute to society.