Title

1D: Gold Boom Gone Bust: The History of Auroria, Georgia

Presenter Information

Leah JarrettFollow

Faculty Mentor(s)

Phillip Guerty

Campus

Gainesville

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

History/Anthropology/Philosophy

Location

Panel 1: D (Register Here)

Start Date

26-3-2021 10:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 10:50 AM

Description/Abstract

In the 1830s, Lumpkin county, centrally situated on the “gold belt,” experienced the initial American gold boom. Individuals encroached upon traditional Cherokee lands, waving previous territorial agreements in the name of profit. Constructed in response to increased American interest, the impromptu mining town of Auraria followed this trend as it developed around the cache of gold. A raucous intersection of diverse individuals, Auraria focused their disparate pasts around an emotion of unbridled anticipation. Miners and policymakers alike disregarded indigenous claims to the land. Prospects of territorial and mineral wealth motivated federal expansionist policies towards Cherokee lands, resulting in the forced exodus of the Cherokee nation in 1838. Exploration of the Auraria mining town, emblematic of the region, allows further consideration of individual and federal responses towards prospects of financial success, regardless of the humanitarian consequences.

Media Format

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Mar 26th, 10:00 AM Mar 26th, 10:50 AM

1D: Gold Boom Gone Bust: The History of Auroria, Georgia

Panel 1: D (Register Here)

In the 1830s, Lumpkin county, centrally situated on the “gold belt,” experienced the initial American gold boom. Individuals encroached upon traditional Cherokee lands, waving previous territorial agreements in the name of profit. Constructed in response to increased American interest, the impromptu mining town of Auraria followed this trend as it developed around the cache of gold. A raucous intersection of diverse individuals, Auraria focused their disparate pasts around an emotion of unbridled anticipation. Miners and policymakers alike disregarded indigenous claims to the land. Prospects of territorial and mineral wealth motivated federal expansionist policies towards Cherokee lands, resulting in the forced exodus of the Cherokee nation in 1838. Exploration of the Auraria mining town, emblematic of the region, allows further consideration of individual and federal responses towards prospects of financial success, regardless of the humanitarian consequences.