Title

Panel D: Unconscious Bias: An Uncomfortable but Essential Reflection in Law Enforcement Operations

Presenter Information

MICHAELA SCHIESSERFollow

Faculty Mentor(s)

Batchelder, John

Campus

Dahlonega

Proposal Type

Oral Presentation

Subject Area

Criminal Justice

Location

Nesbitt 3204

Start Date

25-3-2022 10:00 AM

End Date

25-3-2022 11:00 AM

Description/Abstract

This paper focuses on the role of unconscious bias in law enforcement operations, including law making, policy presenting, and societal interaction between peacemakers and citizens. Since bias is not a controlled brain process, addressing the negative effects, and making changes can be challenging. In order to assist with helpful remedies, this study investigates techniques for intentionally reflecting on officer’s reactions to certain demographics. It then explores how to broaden the interaction process, to reshape the officer’s view of a given demographic, and improve the approach to interactions with the demographic moving forward. This paper concludes with a careful examination of the racial and gender unconscious biases commonly found in law enforcement experiences and the assumption and stereotypes that pervade in our culture.

Media Format

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Mar 25th, 10:00 AM Mar 25th, 11:00 AM

Panel D: Unconscious Bias: An Uncomfortable but Essential Reflection in Law Enforcement Operations

Nesbitt 3204

This paper focuses on the role of unconscious bias in law enforcement operations, including law making, policy presenting, and societal interaction between peacemakers and citizens. Since bias is not a controlled brain process, addressing the negative effects, and making changes can be challenging. In order to assist with helpful remedies, this study investigates techniques for intentionally reflecting on officer’s reactions to certain demographics. It then explores how to broaden the interaction process, to reshape the officer’s view of a given demographic, and improve the approach to interactions with the demographic moving forward. This paper concludes with a careful examination of the racial and gender unconscious biases commonly found in law enforcement experiences and the assumption and stereotypes that pervade in our culture.