Title

An Examination of Educators' Attitudes Toward Inclusion

Campus

Gainesville

Publication date

10-2016

Publisher

Online Journal of New Horizons in Education

Book or Journal Information

Vol 6, no. 4

Keywords

attitude, inclusion, special education, experience, training, Principals and Inclusion Survey

Abstract

:Educators responded to the Principals and Inclusion Survey, measuring the experiences, training, attitudes of educators toward inclusion, and beliefs about the most appropriate placement of students with disabilities. Results revealed that the educators held a positive view of the inclusion model. However, the educators did not believe that general education should be modified to meet the needs of all students. The educators indicated that they believed that most of their students with disabilities could be served appropriately from regular classroom instruction and the resource room. The more positive the educators’ inclusive attitude was, the less restrictive the learning environment was seen as most appropriate for specific learning disabilities, EBD, speech/language impairment, and autism/pervasive development disorder. Significant correlations were found between their attitude toward inclusion and the number of special education training courses taken, formal field-based training, and number of years of full-time special education teaching experience.

Author Biography

Bobbie Neal is a public school teacher and graduate alumni at the University of North Georgia. Josh Cuevas is a professor and educational psychologist at the University of North Georgia

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An Examination of Educators' Attitudes Toward Inclusion

:Educators responded to the Principals and Inclusion Survey, measuring the experiences, training, attitudes of educators toward inclusion, and beliefs about the most appropriate placement of students with disabilities. Results revealed that the educators held a positive view of the inclusion model. However, the educators did not believe that general education should be modified to meet the needs of all students. The educators indicated that they believed that most of their students with disabilities could be served appropriately from regular classroom instruction and the resource room. The more positive the educators’ inclusive attitude was, the less restrictive the learning environment was seen as most appropriate for specific learning disabilities, EBD, speech/language impairment, and autism/pervasive development disorder. Significant correlations were found between their attitude toward inclusion and the number of special education training courses taken, formal field-based training, and number of years of full-time special education teaching experience.