Title

Applied Cognition: Testing the Effects of Independent Silent Reading on Secondary Students’ Achievement and Attribution

Campus

Gainesville

Publication date

1-2014

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Book or Journal Information

Reading Psychology

Keywords

reading, comprehension, independent silent reading, attribution

Abstract

This study implemented an independent silent reading (ISR) program with 145 10th grade students. Students were measured on total reading ability, vocabulary, reading comprehension, a state-mandated high stakes end-of-course test (EOCT), and reading attribution. After controlling for initial skill and disposition levels, the results indicated that students from the ISR groups made greater gains than the control group in total reading ability, reading comprehension, EOCT reading scores, and success/ability attribution. This research offers much-needed data on secondary students’ reading achievement and disposition and provides evidence for one method, ISR, that has broad potential to address development in these areas.

Author Biography

Josh Cuevas is a professor and educational psychologist at the University of North Georgia.

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Applied Cognition: Testing the Effects of Independent Silent Reading on Secondary Students’ Achievement and Attribution

This study implemented an independent silent reading (ISR) program with 145 10th grade students. Students were measured on total reading ability, vocabulary, reading comprehension, a state-mandated high stakes end-of-course test (EOCT), and reading attribution. After controlling for initial skill and disposition levels, the results indicated that students from the ISR groups made greater gains than the control group in total reading ability, reading comprehension, EOCT reading scores, and success/ability attribution. This research offers much-needed data on secondary students’ reading achievement and disposition and provides evidence for one method, ISR, that has broad potential to address development in these areas.