Title

Designing customizable reading modules for a high school literature classroom.

Campus

Gainesville

Publication date

2014

Publisher

Springer

Book or Journal Information

Tech Trends

Keywords

K-12 reading, classroom technology integration, design-based research, PowerPoint, animated text, kinetic typography

Abstract

This design case follows an ongoing collaboration between an instructional technologist and a high school literature teacher promoting reading comprehension through modules that provide visually interesting display of text on a computer screen along with cognitive tools. The modules were found to boost comprehension of specific content in even one use, and over time, overall reading skills were improved. Specific examples from the design and development process of this collaboration are shared here to illustrate decisions made in the face of common constraints—limited time, funding, and technical know-how—that emerged from theory and pilot studies. Teachereducators and their instructional-technology collaborators can use the information from this design and research process to harness the potential of ubiquitous software in affordable, replicable, and pedagogically sound ways.

Author Biography

L. Roxanne Russell's professional and research focus is exploring educational collaborations to meet global challenges of sustainable and equitable development. Josh Cuevas is a professor and educational psychologist at the University of North Georgia.

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Designing customizable reading modules for a high school literature classroom.

This design case follows an ongoing collaboration between an instructional technologist and a high school literature teacher promoting reading comprehension through modules that provide visually interesting display of text on a computer screen along with cognitive tools. The modules were found to boost comprehension of specific content in even one use, and over time, overall reading skills were improved. Specific examples from the design and development process of this collaboration are shared here to illustrate decisions made in the face of common constraints—limited time, funding, and technical know-how—that emerged from theory and pilot studies. Teachereducators and their instructional-technology collaborators can use the information from this design and research process to harness the potential of ubiquitous software in affordable, replicable, and pedagogically sound ways.