Title

Technological Developments in Computer Art from the Mid-20th Century to the Present

Campus

Dahlonega

Publication date

7-2019

Publisher

International Conference Computer Graphics Imaging and Visualization (CGIV)

Abstract

This paper recounts the history of important milestones in computer art, including pre-digital influences and imagery created with electronic/new media and analog computers, specifically built for that purpose. Particular emphasis will be paid to the people, places, tools, and techniques developed in the 1970s and later, many of which are still integral to computer art today. Significant works of imagery, animation, and visual effects will be presented in the context of a historical timeline, culminating in the release of the first fully computer-animated feature-length film. Developments in realism continued that continually blur the line between the real and the unreal.

Author Biography

Dan Johnson is a digital artist, having worked for years as an art director, illustrator, animator, and digital visual effects artist. He has worked on effects for film and TV, including as a digital paint artist on Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. He is an Adobe Certified Instructor and taught computer graphics at various Northern California locations before moving to Georgia. As a digital artist with a traditional media background, he is largely self-taught and now shares his experience and techniques gained through years of trial and error. Dan graduated from Brigham Young University in 1996 with a B.F.A. in Illustration. He mainly teaches digital art classes, including Intro to Computer Graphics, Digital Visual Effects, Digital Illustration, Intro to Graphic Design, and History of Digital Art. During the summer, he often teaches figure drawing.

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Technological Developments in Computer Art from the Mid-20th Century to the Present

This paper recounts the history of important milestones in computer art, including pre-digital influences and imagery created with electronic/new media and analog computers, specifically built for that purpose. Particular emphasis will be paid to the people, places, tools, and techniques developed in the 1970s and later, many of which are still integral to computer art today. Significant works of imagery, animation, and visual effects will be presented in the context of a historical timeline, culminating in the release of the first fully computer-animated feature-length film. Developments in realism continued that continually blur the line between the real and the unreal.