Campus

Gainesville

Publication date

8-15-2021

Publisher

International Journal of Technology in Education

Book or Journal Information

https://doi.org/10.46328/ijte.130

Keywords

Academic achievement, Sense of learning, Cellphone technology, Instructional text messaging, Administrative text messaging

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of instructional and administrative text messages on student academic achievement and sense of learning. Ninety-eight Food, Nutrition, and Wellness students in grades 9th through 12th were involved in this study. In this quasi-experimental study, there was an experimental group and a comparison group. Students in the experimental group received instructional and administrative text messages three times a week for a total of nine weeks. A one-way ANCOVA and independent samples t-test were used for data analyses. The study found a statistically significant difference in academic achievement and sense of learning with students in the experimental group scoring higher as compared to students in the control group. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference with females in the treatment group scoring higher than males in the treatment group.

Author Biography

Sarah Moore is a graduate of the College of Education at the University of North Georgia and a public school teacher. Joshua A. Cuevas is a professor and educational psychologist in the College of Education at the University of North Georgia, USA. His research interests include applied cognition, assessment, educational measurement, evidence-based reasoning, and memory.

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The effects of instructional and administrative text messages on academic achievement and student perception of learning in a high school food, nutrition, and wellness classroom.

This study investigated the effects of instructional and administrative text messages on student academic achievement and sense of learning. Ninety-eight Food, Nutrition, and Wellness students in grades 9th through 12th were involved in this study. In this quasi-experimental study, there was an experimental group and a comparison group. Students in the experimental group received instructional and administrative text messages three times a week for a total of nine weeks. A one-way ANCOVA and independent samples t-test were used for data analyses. The study found a statistically significant difference in academic achievement and sense of learning with students in the experimental group scoring higher as compared to students in the control group. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference with females in the treatment group scoring higher than males in the treatment group.